July 24, 2016

Ryan Harry – a contractor with a difference

Imposing columns; soaring ceilings; smoothly plastered walls; glossy hardwood floors; elegant entries. Ryan Harry of Creative Designs Construction is no ordinary contractor, a fact he himself points out.

Contractor Ryan Harry

Contractor Ryan Harry

house 6 house 5 house 3
“I do not consider myself a contractor: I’m more of a builder/developer…..A contractor is just someone who’s contracted to follow plans and build according to specifications……I do my own designs, plans, consultations, research, land development and construction!!”
The quality of his work is evident in the homes he has built. Harry spent most of his working years constructing homes in Barbados and that experience is evident in his exquisite concrete structures that make you say ‘wow, that’s nice’.

One of the many houses designed and constructed by Ryan Harry

One of the many houses designed and constructed by Ryan Harry

The 35-year-old, who was raised in Albouystown, left Guyana after graduating from the North Georgetown Secondary School to pursue studies at the University of West Indies Cave Hill Campus in the sister Caricom country. He has always been fascinated by the process of turning architectural drawings into reality and, as such, got into the construction business.
“I love and enjoy being creative with buildings, designs and construction…it drives and motivates me to be imaginative and creative…I can’t see myself doing any other job in this lifetime.”
The seasoned builder was prompted to start his own business when he returned home and realised the local construction industry was for the most part stuck in the past, with the familiar old designs and technologies and materials.
“The construction market in Guyana is very primitive…..the drive to introduce new building designs and creativity can be successful,” he forthrightly noted.
His lofty goal is “to introduce Guyana to a standard code of building and modern designs; our landscape is of old and one-dimensional houses and designs”.
“Guyana is very much a developing country with an ever-changing landscape and infrastructure, builders with creative imagination and new ideas will be very much in demand during this period!!” the married father of one emphatically stated when questioned about his business’s future given the state of Guyana’s economy.
To those thinking of following in his footsteps, he advised: “Construction is a very competitive industry, where clients are very impatient …you have to be on time, on schedule and on budget. Clients want value for their money.”
He said would-be entrepreneurs generally should believe in themselves and work hard to achieve their goals – “baby steps!!”— highlighting that dedication and patience were absolutely vital qualities of business owners.
Asked about some of the hurdles he has overcome on his journey to owning and managing his own company of 16 employees, he rattled off: “Xenophobia working in foreign countries, having to learn to adapt to building methods in Guyana and the attitudes of local construction workers not being punctual and their carefree lifestyles, trying to instil better building codes and safety in Guyana.”
“Most small entrepreneurs’ biggest challenge is starting capital or access to starting capital and the opportunities for young and inexperienced companies are limited,” the Campbellville resident added, “Clients mostly trust and give jobs to the more recognised and established companies.” Measures that address those issues, and help small businesses get started and be able to compete with larger companies are necessary to develop the sector.
But Harry, who counts among his influences, Roberto Hardie, former Project Manager/Civil Engineer at the Barbados-based GH Construction and Sir Charles Williams, a land developer and construction magnate in Barbados, is determined to grow his business in spite of the hurdles. “I’m inspired by success….Success is defined by your accomplishments, both tangible and intangible.”
Contact: 36 Garnett St Campbellville, Georgetown; email: ryan69gy@yahoo.com; cell: 680-6517

The captivating mining town of Linden

In the mining town of Linden that is bursting with activities and resources, one can always be assured of being mesmerised by the countless ideal locations to match every individual preference.
Upon entering the town of Linden from the Linden/Soesdyke Highway, one can brace oneself to be wowed by the sceneries on each side of the road. If you are a nature lover, you will be blown away immediately as you descend the hilly road viewing the hills of clay and the

Christianburg Water Wheel

Christianburg Water Wheel

alluring beautiful lakes below. Visitors to the town can witness the largest community, Amelia’s Ward, in the Caribbean as they make their way into the heart of the town.
Over the years Linden has developed significantly, garnering another Bank among other developments. A place of interest with the town’s rich history is its very own museum, located just a stone’s throw from the Demerara River.
The Demerara River divides Wismar and Mackenzie which allows residents to use the water taxis to access either shore. The

Wisroc Library

Wisroc Library

Wismar/Mackenzie Bridge is another mode of transportation for residents that is frequently used instead of the water taxis.
The best aspect of the mining town is its people. They are known for their resilience, unity and zeal. Lindeners are known to be their brother’s keepers. Their hospitality can be sensed from miles away. Lindeners are also known for their profound talents that many times outshines other performers.
In the past GTT jingle competitions, Linden became known as the town that would cart away the top positions.

Christianburg Water Wheel
As one passes the historic industrial Christianburg Waterwheel monument, a sense of pride arises to witness the evidence of what made the mining town into what it is today. One can also be saddened by this site since many are able to visualise the potential of this masterpiece in today’s economy.

Mackenzie Sports Club Ground

Mackenzie Sports Club Ground

Linden Museum

Linden Museum

The Christianburg Waterwheel was materialised in 1855 by a Scottish engineer, John Patterson who saw the need for this industrial mechanism to boost his timber production.
In 1803, after the English invasion, the Scottish engineer was selected to prepare housing for governmental officials. It is documented that following the preparation of housing, Patterson obtained a small number of vessels from the indigenous community and began the production of logging.
The Christianburg Waterwheel came in light of Patterson’s struggle of manual labour to tie logs together, followed by placing the logs on a punt. The manual labour proved to be time consuming and expensive on a long-term basis.
The Katabuli creek was later identified as the place of operation since the dynamic force of the flowing water from the creek was able to sustain the hydro-powered sawmill. The sawmill ceased operations in 1950 and has now become a relic.
Recreation
The mining town of Linden is not only known for its minerals but also for its captivating and luring beautiful lakes. These picturesque

Wismar Mackenzie Bridge

Wismar Mackenzie Bridge

lakes are located in Region 10 only and speak volumes to the tourism sector, with many Lindeners vocal on the topic of transforming these lakes into “top tourist destinations in Guyana”
Some time back, persons were trying to develop these appealing lakes into tourist sites.
These lakes were formed after bauxite mining was discontinued in the areas. The lakes are craters that were dug to access the precious ore – bauxite.

Blue lake

Blue lake

While it is not advised, many persons find it refreshing to swim in the blue lakes. Additionally, tasty “fat pork” or Coco plum (local fruit, scientifically named Chrysobalonas Icaco) are always to the avail of swimmers. “Fat pork” commonly grows around the lakes that everyone seems to enjoy after becoming familiar with it. It is a small pink fruit that is cushioned in white internally, also bearing a nut inside.
Linden presents options when it comes to recreation, mainly swimming. Buck Town creek that is located some distances from the community and Blueberry Hill are always filed on Sundays.
Motorists can always see families and friends enjoying the water or playing on the beach. The creek also possesses a small hotwater pond that anyone can go and soak in.

Mackenzie Sports Club ground
This ground holds a host of memories for every Lindener, whether it is flag-raising ceremonies, national games, Mahramani school competitions, National sports finals, massive parties or funerals, every Lindener can at least attest to one fond memory of this ground.
In 1916, the Mackenzie Sports Club Ground that is commonly known as MSC was built by the Demerara Bauxite Company which started mining in the town that same year.
The MSC ground is located in the heart of the town on Greenheart Street, which caters for cricket, football, basketball, volleyball, tennis, track and field, cycling, field hockey and various cultural and social activities.

Boat stelling

Boat stelling

The ground is familiar with the popular Linden Town Week activities. Apart from the outdoor activities, MSC caters for indoor events such as dominoes, billiards, table tennis, darts and many others.

Library
On Saturday mornings, the public buses can be seen filled with children and their haversacks, all heading to the library. The library is a sanctuary for the children to meet and compete to borrow the best books. The library serves as a research and study zone for secondary school students that often need to be notified when the library is closing.
The library helps a number of students who cannot afford to purchase every book, an opportunity to have those books at their own convenience.
Almost 10 years ago, in July 2015, The Stacey Walters Library opened its doors to the public. The Library caters to for all ages of people. It was built by an overseas-based Guyanese Ingrid Walters.
The project was orchestrated through the loss of her daughter, Stacey Walters which the library was named after. The Library was built to serve the residents of the Wismar shore, mainly.

Leonora, a village on the rise…

By: Kizzy Coleman

A village transcending expectations in terms of development, Leonora, West Coast Demerara, formerly called Plantation Leonora is situated in Region 3 (Essequibo Islands-West Demerara).

Leonora Police Station

Leonora Police Station

Leonora Secondary School

Leonora Secondary School

A now thriving village with modern establishments, Leonora can be described as one of the most exciting villages in Guyana.
Neighboured by Anna Catherina and Stewartville, Leonora is a clear standout.
There are a number of villages in Guyana with great historical significance, and Leonora is among them.
The name Leonora is derived from the Dutch who were once occupants of this country.

Leonora Synthetic Race Track

Leonora Synthetic Race Track

It originated from the names of two Dutch children, a boy named Leon and girl, Nora.
Leonora encompasses an area of five square miles, and was once part of the Parish of St Luke.
Being a close-knit community, the three leading religions (Christianity, Hinduism and Islamism) are practiced without prejudice.
History
Visiting Leonora, the older folks were eager to delve into the history of their now modernised village.
Tales were told of the old estate, the workers, and the logies.
The Leonora estate which was closed down in December 1986, was ran by various proprietors, attorneys and administrators.
The labour force on the estate was supplied by indentured labourers brought to then British Guiana by various countries, including India.
These workers were all housed in logies that were divided into two rooms. These logies were poorly made insanitary houses built close to the estate so the workers could have easy access to plantations and for the owners to have easy access to the workers.
The majority of the workers laboured in the cane fields from early morning till night—every day.
Apart from the estate location in those days, Leonora was comprised of Groenveldt and pasture lands. These two areas stretched mainly along the public road, and away from the sugar estate. The rest of land that made up the area of Leonora was used for pasture, rice plots and limited farmlands. As time went by, the estate allowed some of the labourers to cultivate rice on the plots and to do limited farming.
With development in the community today, those rice plots have been turned into thriving housing schemes.
Leonora today
Entering Leonora today oh, how things have changed. The village has been made into one of the most developed on the WCD.
Leonora is home to one of the leading hospitals in the country, the Leonora Cottage Hospital. It also houses many schools, a Magistrate Court, Fire Station, Police Station, Market and now the newly built Synthetic Race Track, the first ever in Guyana.
Costing $1.084 billion, Guyana’s first Synthetic Track and Field facility was officially opened in April of 2015.
Since the opening there have been major activities hosted in Leonora. It is the hope that one day Olympians will excel on the track as Guyana hopes to host the Olympics in the future.
Walking around the community, excited and smiling faces could be seen as the people of the community are ready and waiting to welcome all who visit.